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  • All About Fingering Yarn
  • Rob Colon
  • all about yarncrochetcrochet tipsknitcrateknittingknitting tips

All About Fingering Yarn

Did you know that Fingering weight and sock yarn aren’t always the exact same thing? Today, we’re exploring Fingering weight yarn that isn’t sock yarn as part of our ‘All About Yarn’ series. (Check out the first post in this series, All About Sock Yarn).

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photo by Hannah Thiessen, featuring two Plucky Knitter fingering-weights

Often mis-called ‘Fingerling’ yarn, Fingering weight yarn typically knits up best on a size US 0 - US 2 (2 - 2.75 mm), or a US 1.5 - 2.5 crochet hook. Some of you might know it as ‘Baby’ yarn, due to the popular practice of acrylic companies labeling it as such and packaging it in pastel colors with baby patterns. In truth, Fingering weight yarn can be used for so much more than baby garments! 

An Affordable Luxury

One of the best things about using a Fingering-weight yarn for a project is that the yardage is usually really high: between 350 - 440 yards per skein. This means that you can get many projects out of a single skein and give yourself a chance to try some luxury blends you may not be able to afford in larger quantities.

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photo by Zen Yarn Garden

Zen Yarn Garden’s Serenity Single is a single-ply, Fingering weight yarn blended with cashmere, silk, and Merino wool. You get 430 yards per skein (which retails for around $30 - $35 depending on where you buy it). 

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photo by Hunter Hammerson; pattern from Curls 2 book

Any of these as a single skein is enough yarn to make a medium sized version of Hunter Hammerson’s beautiful Deceit Shawl.

Fine Gauge Finish

Have you ever wanted to knit or crochet a garment that looks so professional people ask you where you bought it? Fingering weight yarn is one of the best ways to get the fine-gauge look you see in store-bought knits. With smooth stockinette and a great pattern, you’ll be able to mimic your favorite high-end brands at a fraction of the cost (even when using natural fibers)! 

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photo by Shibui Knits

Shibui Knits is a great company to look to for both yarn and patterns inspired by upscale boutiques. Their Reed yarn is 100% linen and works up beautifully solo or when held together using their MIX concept with other yarns, as shown in this elegant Athens tank top by Shellie Anderson:

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Less Fussy Lace

A lot of knitters and crocheters prefer to use Fingering weight yarns for their lace projects because it adds a bit of heft and vision to the stitches, and makes finished shawls a little more sturdy. You can see a good example of this in Aimee Hansen’s crochet shawl for our June 2017 crate, Favorite Things

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Why do you love Fingering weight yarns? 

  • Rob Colon
  • all about yarncrochetcrochet tipsknitcrateknittingknitting tips