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  • Crochet Stitch: Herringbone Double Crochet
  • Rob Colon
  • crochetcrochet stitchcrochet stitchescrochet tips

Crochet Stitch: Herringbone Double Crochet

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It always amazes me how many different ways you can manipulate a basic stitch and turn it into something completely different. The first time I created a herringbone double crochet, I thought to myself, “why had I never thought to make a stitch this way?”

A herringbone design is a sort of interlocking V-shaped zigzag that dates back to the Roman Empire where it was used as a pattern for making roads and textiles. It gets its name for how closely it resembles the bone structure of an actual herring. Today, you see it most often in tweed and twill fabrics as well as brick work for roads, fireplaces, and more.

Crocheting the herringbone double crochet will give you a solid fabric with just a little give that’s ideal for small projects like dishcloths and scarves, and larger products like blankets, sweaters, and other garments. It’s similar enough to a standard double crochet that you can alternate between striped rows of herringbone and rows of another stitch when creating your own designs. Just remember that, to get the signature V-shaped design, you’ll need to complete 2 or more rows of the herringbone double crochet.

Constructing this stitch requires following a few steps, but it’s easy to memorize. Once you get going and see how each row plays off of the last, you’ll get excited to create it again and again.

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Here are the steps for an individual stitch:

Step 1: Yarn over. Insert your hook into the next stitch.

Step 2: Yarn over. Pull a loop through the stitch AND through the first loop on your hook. You’ll have 2 loops left on your hook at this point.

Step 3: Yarn over. Pull this loop through the next loop on your hook (just the one loop, not both loops). You’ll have 2 loops left on your hook still.

Step 4: Yarn over. Pull this loop through both loops on your hook to finish the stitch.

You’ll see how your stitches lean a bit to the left. This tilt is created from step 2 of the stitch where that first loop is locked in place and shifted just slightly to the left. After that, the remaining parts of the stitch build off of this placement and also lean towards the left. Turning your piece will have you working the stitch in the opposite direction and give you that herringbone zigzag.

Is your mind as blown as mine was? In almost 2 decades of crocheting, I had never thought to just pull through that first loop. I love the fabric it creates in just a couple variations of a basic double crochet.

Swatch it up!

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Grab your hook and yarn to create a swatch of this stitch.

Herringbone Double Crochet Stitch Pattern

Notes:

· This stitch is created in a 1:1 ratio of chains to stitches. Chain any multiple of chains to create this stitch.

· Ch 3 at the beginning of a row counts as the first stitch throughout the pattern. If you find this to be too gappy, try a ch 2 instead.

· In order to maintain the signature herringbone design, you’ll need to complete at least 2 rows of the pattern.

Abbreviations:

ch = chain yo = yarn over st = stitch

Ch any multiple of stitches.

Row 1: Yo. Insert hook into the 4th ch from hook. Yo and pull loop through the ch and the next loop on the hook. Yo and pull this loop through the next loop on your hook. Yo and pull through both loops on your hook. *Yo. Insert your hook into the next ch. Yo and pull loop through the ch and the next loop on the hook. Yo and pull this loop through the next loop on your hook. Yo and pull through both loops on your hook. Repeat from * across. Turn.

Row 2: Ch 3 (counts as first st now and throughout). *Yo. Insert your hook into the next st. Yo and pull loop through the st and the next loop on the hook. Yo and pull this loop through the next loop on your hook. Yo and pull through both loops on your hook. Repeat from * across. Turn.

Repeat row 2 until your piece is your desired length.

Written by Aimee Hansen of Yarngerie, who has also been a featured crochet designer in Knitcrate. Check out her featured patterns: Favorite Things Shawl & Phoenix Rising Shawl in the Knitcrate Shop!

  • Rob Colon
  • crochetcrochet stitchcrochet stitchescrochet tips