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Tips and tricks for the November 2017 KNITCRATE by Dayana Knits

Tips and tricks for the November 2017 KNITCRATE by Dayana Knits:
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I was so excited to get self-striping yarn in this month’s KnitCrate because I love knitting with it. Why? Even the simplest project becomes way more interesting when you’re waiting for the next color to pop up!

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This month’s pattern, the Patina Scarf by Hannah Thiessen, is a perfect way to show off the beautiful Uru.Yarn, hand-dyed by KnitCrate.

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TIP 1: Winding self-striping skeins

The unique thing about self-striping skeins is that there is a specific color order to each colorway. Opening up a skein of Uru.Yarn was a delight to see firsthand how this type of yarn is dyed and wound. This colorway is “Pinwheel”.

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The Patina Scarf actually reverses color order in the center of the scarf, so it’s really important to understand how the skeins are ordered and which end of the yarn you’re supposed to start from. It’s so easy peasy that you’ll see even my cat can do it (ok, that could be an exaggeration):

VIDEO TIP: Click here!

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TIP #2: Measuring gauge on the diagonal

While the Patina Scarf stitch pattern is a simple 1x1 rib, decreases at the beginning of a row paired with increases at the end of a row give the scarf a clever diagonal direction to the knitting.

Gauge is usually not critical in a scarf (unless you have limited yardage), but you do find “diagonal” or “on the bias” stitch patterns like this in many designs. Be cautious when measuring gauge in a diagonal pattern, especially row gauge! Here’s how to do it like a pro:

VIDEO TIPClick here!

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TIP #3: K2tog vs. SSK

The K2tog decreases at the beginning of the Patina Scarf’s right side rows get the diagonal going nicely. This is a perfect opportunity to show you how not all decreases are created equal! Designers think carefully about what stitches are used to create an effect. I thought that it might not make a difference to use a SSK, but boy was I wrong:

VIDEO TIP: Click here!

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TIP #4: Why is the first stitch slipped?

Ah yes, an age-old question. Some patterns slip the first stitch, some don’t. This one does, why? Well, it’s all about what shows! Scarf edges, belt edges – anything that will not be seamed and sees the light of day should have a “slip stitch” edge. Here’s how you do it:

VIDEO TIP: Click here!

Until next time!

With love,

- Dayana Knits

If you want to try a KnitCrate,  click here to join me and use coupon code “DK20” for 20% off!

And, OF COURSE, you can follow Dayana Knits any way you like:

Blog: www.dayanaknits.com

Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/DayanaKnits

Ravelry: www.ravelry.com/people/DayanaKnits

Instagram: www.instagram.com/dayanaknits