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  • Tips on the January 2018 Knitcrate
  • Rob Colon
  • dayana knitsjanuary 2018 Knitcrateknitcrateknitcrate january 2018knittingknitting patternsknitting tips

Tips on the January 2018 Knitcrate

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photo by Dayana Knits

“Oooooooh!” Yes, that was me when I opened up my standard KnitCrate this month! I had heard there were three possible colorways coming from the yarn line Audine Wools by KNITCRATE, and was very happy to pull out this oh-so-sleek shade called Turtledove. “Is that gray?” I asked myself, moving in and out of daylight. “Bluish? Greenish?” Aha! It was exactly the color of the ‘pickling’ I had done to the wood outside of my house… that’s why I loved it!

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photo by Dayana Knits

I also thought that the included knitting pattern, En Pointe Shawlette by Joyce Fassbender, would look divine in it.

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TIP 1: Blocking shawl edging

The En Pointe Shawlette has a classic triangle shape with beautiful lace medallions that cascade into a pointed edging. Now how is that edging accomplished? It doesn’t just fall into place after knitting, I’ll tell you that much! A lace shawl could always use a little extra blocking love on the edge, which is often the ‘wow’ moment in a shawl. In this video, I show you two ways to block the edging into exactly the shape you want:

A note about how I prefer to block my shawls. To avoid stretching them out beyond what they may want to do, I pin my shawl while it’s dry, not wet. I then spray it generously with water and let it dry overnight. If you’d like to clean your shawl or have it smell nice, you can also add some no-rinse wool wash to your spray bottle! 

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Blocking Fleck by rhyFlower Knits, from the September 2017 KnitCrate 

TIP 2: Marking your place in a chart

Most lace patterns require you to follow charts with motifs/rows that repeat. Over the years, I’ve used many different methods to mark what row I’m at in a chart, but guess what? My favorite one is the easiest method you’ve NEVER HEARD OF! Seriously – I only discovered it while reading a knitting tips column in a 1960’s women’s magazine:

In the video I showed you two “analog” tips for when you’ve printed out a copy of your chart. Many of us are more “digital”, so here’s the method I use for the .pdf patterns I use on my phone or tablet. Most .pdf reader apps (I use GoodReader) will have a drawing toolbar you can activate. Simply choose the line-making tool and extend the ends of the line so that they are wide enough for your chart.

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graphic from Dayana Knits

When you’ve finished a row, just select the line and move it upwards! I also like to make vertical lines in a different color that I can move as I decrease or increase. This helps me start at the right stitch every row without having to think about it.

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photo by Dayana Knits

Until next time!

With love,

- Dayana Knits

If you want to try a KnitCrate on me, visit the KnitCrate website (http://mbsy.co/gLfBV) and use coupon code “DK20” for 20% off!

For more tips, tricks and “knitspiration” you can follow Dayana Knits any way you like:

Blog: www.dayanaknits.com

Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/DayanaKnits

Ravelry: www.ravelry.com/people/DayanaKnits

Instagram: www.instagram.com/dayanaknits

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  • Rob Colon
  • dayana knitsjanuary 2018 Knitcrateknitcrateknitcrate january 2018knittingknitting patternsknitting tips